How did I end up here? Medium has been a platform that I have been revisiting quite frequently. Therefore, I felt that I wanted to give back to the community by sharing some of my experiences and thoughts mainly about my own software development profession.

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This is me 😀

So who am I? I am a 27-years-old software developer who is born and raised in Sweden, with roots from Ethiopia and Afghanistan. I have had a genuine interest for computers since I was a little kid, but I was never introduced to programming until later in my life.

Like many young people, I had no clear path that I wanted to take in my life or a real career that I wanted to pursue. It was first when one of my friends who is working as a software testing engineer spoke to me about coding and recommended an educational platform to me — FreeCodeCamp.org — that I started looking into programming. I went in there and started to learn web development slowly. Fast-forward three years — I got employed at a consultancy company in my own city while pursuing a college degree in Computer Engineering. …


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Photo on Unsplash by Joshua Aragon (@goshua13)

A topic which is often debated among junior and entry-level developers is whether the job market for software developers is oversaturated or not. In other words, is there a lack of available programming jobs in the market at the moment? Of course, some areas have a higher demand for software developers than others, but there are some patterns that can be recognized globally.

First and foremost, it is necessary to discuss why some developers are experiencing a real hardship in finding programming jobs, and why others are experiencing the complete opposite. My perception is that the ones who face hardships with finding a job are usually the entry-level/junior developers. …


Should You Learn Data Structures and Algorithms Or New Languages and Frameworks?

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Photo on Unsplash by Tim Gouw (@punttim)

New developers frequently find themselves asking this question. As a new developer, you can easily get intimidated by the vast amount of information out there about programming and software development. It is a big ocean of knowledge and it can quickly become overwhelming for someone just starting out.

This is especially true if you’re trying to get into the field as a self-taught developer. Those who take the traditional college route are better off in the sense that they get a clear roadmap to follow and their mentors will guide them along the way. Yes, there are roadmaps to follow for the self-taught developer too, but it is not that obvious, since different people will tell you different things. …


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Tailwind CSS — is it worth it?

I never intend to bash any technology on purpose. I believe that every technology has its valid use case. But it is necessary as a developer to analyze a technology as well as its pros and cons before following the trend of adopting it for the sake of it.

One of the newer technologies which gets a lot of attention these days is Tailwind CSS. When I first heard about it, I was immediately interested because of my natural inclination towards the front end world.

Tailwind is a CSS utility framework. It is created for utility purposes, meaning that it is supposed to make development easier. It is unlike the other common CSS frameworks like Bootstrap in the sense that Tailwind doesn’t provide any built-in UI components. …


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Photo on Unsplash by Alvaro Reyes (@alvarordesign)

I am very grateful for having gained great insights and big takeaways early in my career as a software developer. Due to the nature of the project setup that I worked with as well as working in a fairly small team with experienced developers, I managed to pick up lots of learnings on my day-to-day work and grow very rapidly.

There were times where I had to seriously step up my game because of the expectations, and I had to take on bigger responsibilities. …


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Photo on Unsplash by Irvan Smith (@mr_vero)

Getting your feet into the industry of software development can be quite challenging. This is especially true if you fit under at least one of these three categories:

  1. You don’t have a college degree.
  2. You don’t have a network of developers who can give you referrals.
  3. You don’t have prior work experience.

But despite of that, you can still stand out and thrive as a new developer if you focus on sharpening your skills and are able to showcase that in an efficient manner.

In this article, I would like to give three tips on how to stand out as a new developer trying to break into the industry. …


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Photo on Unsplash by Green Chameleon (@craftedbygc)

Anyone who learns software development and programming will have to take an early decision of whether s/he should take the more theoretical, traditional approach of learning, or the more practical approach. The traditional approach is usually the college path where you learn the fundamentals of computer science, how a computer works, memory, data structures and algorithms.

You also have more practical programs in which you learn the required skills and get prepared for an actual developer position and learn how to produce value for a company.

Boot camps are usually of the second category where the focus is purely on the practical side of development, since the instructors are preparing you for a future employment. …


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Photo on Unsplash by Christina @ wocintechchat.com

I frequently follow and consume content by other developers online and see comments by people either trying to get into software development or are already actively learning the craft. I see questions that aspiring developers ask quite often which in actuality has little to no relevance to one’s programming career. I’m not saying that the questions are useless, but I think that these people tend to focus on less important things rather than focusing on what will actually make them thrive as a software developer.

I would like to share five things that I see some new or aspiring developers focus on which I find unnecessary or having low to no value. …


Four key things I kept in mind that led to my success

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Photo on Unsplash by Rick Kimotho

Any aspiring developer dreams about the day when s/he will get hired at a company as a programmer. For most if not all industries, there is a problem that any junior/entry-level worker will inevitably face — how do you get a job without experience, and how do you get experience without a job?

The job opening posts can be quite daunting to someone who lacks experience. They require you to have worked several years with several different technologies. In fact, those requirements have become something that developers joke about since they are sometimes surreal and written by people who don’t have any technical competency. …


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Photo on Unsplash by Caspar Camille Rubin.

Technology is steadily evolving. As human needs grow and newer solutions need to be invented to fulfil those needs, technologies also have to grow. Programmers will therefore have to make sure that they stay up-to-date with the latest technologies out there. Every now and then, new versions are released for the different programming languages, frameworks and libraries.

During the last five years, this has been true especially for web technologies. The way web applications are developed today differs a lot from how it was ten years ago. …

About

Yamo Gebrewold

A fullstack software developer with a great passion for frontend technologies.

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